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Group Asks the Dalai Lama to Renounce Support for Animal Cruelty

April 23, 2007

Contacts: Rick Bogle 608 222 2348; Jean Barnes, Executive Director, 770 719 5348.

In observance of the 21 st annual World Week for Animals in Laboratories (April 22-28), the Primate Freedom Project has sent an open letter to Tenzin Gyatso, the 14th Dalai Lama for the third time to reconsider his support of invasive experimentation on living animals' brains. See http://www.madisonmonkeys.com/letter_to_dalai_lama.pdf

“We have urged His Holiness to reaffirm his vow of compassion for all sentient beings. He seems to have stepped off Buddhism's Nobel Eightfold Path to enlightenment and is now wandering aimlessly, attracted to the glitter of honorary university degrees. He seems to be more attracted to titles and prestige than to kindness; it's a loss to the entire world,” says Rick Bogle, spokesperson for the group.

Largely unwritten about has been the Tibetan leader's transformation from an icon of kindness into an admirer of scientists like Richard Davidson and Ned Kalin at the University of Wisconsin who burn monkeys' brains with acid and then frighten them with snakes, scientists, and bigger monkeys.

His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso, is both the head of state in exile and the spiritual leader of Tibet.

Buddhism is based on a set of profound teachings that urge us to harm no sentient being, to dispel all the misery in the world, and to recognize that all beings are as precious as our mothers.

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Background:

Dalai Lama at UW-Madison: http://www.news.wisc.edu/6205.html

Kalin NH, Shelton SE, Davidson RJ. The role of the central nucleus of the amygdala in mediating fear and anxiety in the primate. J Neurosci. 2004 http://www.jneurosci.org/cgi/content/full/24/24/5506

Kalin NH, Shelton SE, Davidson RJ, Kelley AE. The primate amygdala mediates acute fear but not the behavioral and physiological components of anxious temperament. J Neurosci. 2001 http://www.jneurosci.org/cgi/content/full/21/6/2067

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Madison's Hidden Monkeys is a joint project of the
Alliance for Animals and the
Primate Freedom Project